Tag Archives: persistent villous atrophy

So it appears that Celiacs are not slowly dying after all…

Happy celiac

I recently came across the question, “Are Celiacs really slowly dying?” on one of the Celiac Disease forums. My first thought was, “Aren’t we all slowly dying?” Then, as I read, I realized that the person who posted it was concerned about research showing that many adult Celiacs do not have complete healing of their intestinal mucosa (tissue) despite being on the gluten free diet. This is called “persistent villous atrophy” in the medical world.

One of the major studies of persistent villous atrophy was published in 2009 (see link). Italian researchers studied a large group (n=465) of Celiacs who were on the gluten free diet. The average follow-up biopsy was performed 16 months after biopsy-confirmed diagnosis of Celiac Disease. At the time of follow-up biopsy, 75% of the patients reported that their symptoms had disappeared and 87% of the subjects experienced normalization of their celiac antibody tests on the gluten free diet. Of the 465 Celiacs on the GF diet, they found the following on repeat biopsy: 8% had completely normal duodenal (small intestinal) tissue, 65% were in remission (intestines looked better than at diagnosis, but there were still an increased number of white blood cells in the intestinal tissues), 26% had no change from diagnosis, and 1% were actually worse than prior to going gluten free.

At the end of the paper, the researchers hypothesize that the lack of intestinal healing and increased white blood cells may be due to the continual activation of the innate immune system by small amounts of gluten in “gluten free” foods. I plan to discuss this soon in another post. The Italian researchers’ findings and discussion at the end of their paper have, unfortunately, led many to believe that the gluten free diet is harmful and/or killing all of us with Celiac Disease.

In February 2013 Dr. Green and colleagues at both the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University and in Sweden will be publishing a paper entitled “Mucosal healing and mortality in celiac disease.” Their teams set out to see if a lack of mucosal healing (persistent villous atrophy) is associated with an increased risk of death for patients with Celiac Disease. Similar to the Italian researchers, > 40% of Celiacs were shown to have persistent villous atrophy on follow-up biopsies. However, the researchers found no association between persistent villous atrophy and an increased risk of death for Celiacs. This is definitely a good thing!

After reading both of these papers, I am left with many questions: Why does it take so long for adult Celiacs’ guts to heal after going gluten free? Should we expect the same for children with Celiac Disease? Is the persistence of white blood cells in the intestines contributing to and/or a “marker” of the “leaky gut” that so many of us seem to be experiencing, or is it a normal part of the slow healing process? How is the innate immune system involved? Are follow-up biopsies for Celiacs going to be necessary in the future now that so many patients are diagnosed on the basis of genetics, symptoms, and abnormal antibody testing alone? Isn’t the fact that symptoms resolve and antibodies normalize much more important than what actually shows up on repeat biopsies?

I’ll definitely be hitting the books and reviewing the innate immune system in upcoming weeks with plans to share what I find with you…

**Also, a quick reminder that this is a blog. I am summarizing medical literature, but also adding in my own thoughts and opinions on what I have read. I am not trying to tell anyone what they should do for their own health, nor am I giving medical advice through this page.