Tag Archives: gluten free

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December Book Review, Recipes, and Ramblings

If you are one of my readers who visits this page to be able to learn about newly published research studies about celiac disease and gluten sensitivity, this is not the post for you. I am not going to write about any research this time. Instead, this is going to be a rambling post written by a chronically sleep-deprived, working mother 2 weeks before Christmas! If you don’t like the sounds of it, please stop reading now!

We celebrated Thanksgiving a few weeks with our wonderful friends who have become like family since moving to Wisconsin 4 years ago. M, the husband, went out of his way to prepare an almost entirely GF dinner for all of us, even though I was the only one of the guests unable to eat gluten. He stuffed the turkey with Rudi’s GF stuffing mix and it turned out really good. My husband and I were responsible for only a few items for the dinner, which included cornbread, cranberry sauce, wine and beer, ice cream, and pumpkin pie. I made a lovely pumpkin pie using a GF Pillsbury pie dough the night before Thanksgiving and when I was taking it out of the oven at 9:45 pm I accidentally dropped it to the ground and it was smashed to bits. I foraged through my cupboards and found an old bag of Cup 4 Cup GF flour that I had forgotten I had, and an extra can of easy pumpkin pie filling. I searched the internet for a pie crust recipe using Cup 4 Cup flour and I came across this recipe on a website called Kitchen Simplicity. I followed the recipe using 3 tablespoons of water and the “mix by hand” option because my food processor is broken, and the pie crust turned out a million times better than the first one that I had ruined had tasted (I only know this because I ate a few bites of it that had fallen on my kitchen floor as I tried to figure out if I’d be able to salvage it!) The pie dough from the recipe I made was very soft and the consistency reminded me a lot of other GF doughs, like Chebe. I used my hands, as opposed to a roller, to shape it into the pie dish. I am planning on using it as my basic pie recipe from now on since it was so simple and good. So, in the end I am thankful that I ruined my pie!

Once we get through this crazy week (my two oldest daughters are performing in our local production of the Nutcracker and there are rehearsals or performances every night) we are going to make some Christmas cookies. We have been using an easy cut-out GF sugar cookie recipe that I adapted from the Land O’Lakes recipe with great success (see link). I am going to omit the xanthan gum again this year as I have made it without the gum the last 2 times and we haven’t been able to detect a difference. Please feel free to share any of your favorite GF cookie recipes too in the comments section if you’d like. My kids and I love trying out new cookie recipes and my 4 year old loves to be in the kitchen with me.

I was recently introduced to the children’s book “Gluten-Free Me” written by a fellow Clevelander named Christy Bykowski. Christy’s middle son Beckmin has celiac disease. The main character who is also named Beckmin, has celiac disease, and this book describes his navigation of his first day of kindergarten. My three oldest children, who are 8, 6, and 4, really enjoyed the book and through reading it with them, I feel that they gained a better understanding of why those of us with celiac disease need to be so careful about gluten cross-contamination. I recommend this book for children with celiac disease, as well as siblings, other relatives, and friends of people with celiac disease who are from about 3 to 9 years old. This would also be a great book for teachers to have in their classrooms. You can purchase the book here or at amazon.com. Now that I think about it, it would make a great Christmas gift! As a disclaimer, I was sent a free copy of this book to review.

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A few other random things:

I received an email from a company that has recently created an iPhone/iPad/Droid app called GlutenFree VIP. At this point, outside of reviewing celiac-related books from time to time, as I just did above, I am opting to not review any products for compensation. That being said, I did download the app and was happy to see that GF foods from some great online stores, like Moon Rabbit Foods, are available, so this looks like this may be a promising tool. I haven’t actually tried it yet, but thought that this app may be of interest to some of you to try out.

I was recently hired as a freelance writer by the magazine Gluten-Free Living and my first article about Probiotics and Celiac Disease will be in their Jan/Feb 2014 issue that will soon be hitting the shelves. I encourage you to check it out of you are interested in learning more about the topic and have been considering whether or not to start taking a probiotic. This is my first publication since I published research from my fellowship training, so I am pretty excited about it. Gluten-Free Living is also having a conference in Orlando in April (4th thru 6th) that I am considering attending.

Lastly, I would like to recognize Sue, a fellow Celiac who works in dietary services at the hospital where I work. Over the past few months Sue has gone out of her way to enable me to safely eat in our doctors’ lounge by doing things such as moving the bowl of fruit salad far away from all bread crumbs and keeping a secret stash of Rice Chex and other GF foods for me. Thank you Sue for all of you have done to make my work life easier. I really appreciate it and hope that you are reading this!

If any late-breaking, hugely important celiac-related papers are published between now and Christmas, you will hear from me. Otherwise, I’ll be back sometime around the new year. Merry Christmas to you and your families (if you celebrate) and Happy New Year! I wish you peace, love, and joy. Remember that you can always reach out to me by email at thepatientceliac@gmail.com.

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This was my first Christmas as a mom in 2005. My daughter Grace was 7 weeks old when this was taken. It is one of my favorite Christmas photos and when I look at it I am reminded of how quickly my kids are growing up and that I need to slow down and enjoy the present time with them! And take a break from blogging for a while! I’ll see you in 2014!

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Two Things

Thanks to another cancelled flight, I am apart from my family for one more night. I am desperate to see them and cannot put into words how much I miss them.

3 weeks ago we drove 1300+ miles to visit with family in Cape Cod and Boston. I flew back home to work a week ago and am flying back to meet them in Boston and then drive home with them (I would never make my husband do a 1350 mile road trip with 4 kids under 8 by himself!)  We are going to drive north into Montreal and then across northern Ontario to get home, which is going to be quite the 1350 mile adventure.

This quiet evening has given me the opportunity to run, read, and to reflect. I am grateful that I have been diagnosed with this disease, even though there are aspects of it that really stink.  If you haven’t read or heard, there was an article just published in the Annals of Internal Medicine which affirms that those with untreated Celiac Disease have a much higher risk of lymphoma (cancer) than the general population.  If you haven’t read the article, I encourage you to read this summary. I am glad that I am being treated with the gluten free diet and that I have come to the realization that I needed to make my entire household gluten free in order for my intestines to heal and for my symptoms to resolve. I am thankful for all of you who I have “met” and connected with through this blog over the last 8 months.  I am thankful that this disease has caused me to prioritize the nutrition of my family. If learning that untreated Celiac Disease causes cancer does not lead my family members, and others, to get tested for Celiac Disease, then I do not think that anything will. I want you to get tested because I do not want any of you to get lymphoma, not because I want to make your life harder by having to give up bread!

Over the past month I have had the opportunity to see many family members and friends who I have not seen for a while. I wanted to take this opportunity to thank all of you for being so supportive of my gluten free life and give a few examples of the love I have felt…

Mom: Thank you, thank you, thank you for having a cookout for us when we were visiting in July and having a GF spread for me and the kids (tons of fruit and veggies, tortilla chips, GF hot dog buns, ice cream bars, etc.) It was so wonderful to be able to eat everything at a BBQ without being worried about being sick.

Chan: Thank you for bringing your beautiful kids over and making blueberry mojitos for us to drink, and bringing me my own special crispy rice dessert! I hope that next time we can visit for a bit longer and get more adult time to catch up (and drink more Mojitos!)

Ashleigh: Thanks for introducing me to 2 ingredient (banana and egg pancakes) and for letting me visit with beautiful little Luca.

Carol: Thanks for making kick ass guacamole and buying pistachios galore the week in the Cape.  Thanks also for the adult only time, Zumba class with Bunny, and the re-introduction to Gordon Lightfoot.

Ali: Thank you for making an awesome lunch of chicken and mozzarella caprese salad, my absolute favorite salad, when we came to visit. Thanks also for all of the American Girl stuff for the girls.

Dan: Thanks a bunch for buying me my own stash of Celia beer when we hung out…it’s nice to have a new beer to add into the mix and I was so happy to see that Celia is portrayed as being a healthy female Celiac!

Colleen: Thank you for roasting up all of the leftover veggies for me and for basically feeding my kids for the entire week in the Cape so that I didn’t get sick from preparing their food!

Nana and Pop: Thanks for bringing all of the gluten free food down to the Cape for me, buying me and Claire sweet potatoes, taking care to make sure that the grill was clean before cooking for me on it, and for having an never ending stash of gluten free K cups at your house.

Grace, Tommy, Gabby, and Claire: Thanks for always reminding everyone that gluten makes your mommy sick and for going with me to Captain Frosty’s to get gluten free custard. I cannot wait to hug and squeeze and kiss all of you tomorrow!

Tom: Thank you for supporting me throughout this crazy journey, helping to calm me down when I’m acting a bit crazy (which is just once in a while, right?), and providing unconditional love.  I love you very much!

Happy August everyone! Hope to see some of you at the ICD Symposium in Chicago next month!

celia

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Eating Gluten Free During a 311 km Ragnar Relay

“I have Celiac Disease. I am very hungry and need to be able to eat without getting sick. Can you help me?”  These were my words as I stepped into a chain restaurant called “Crabby Joe’s” in the eastern Toronto area.  I was one third of the way through running a Ragnar Relay in which my team of eleven ran 311 km from Cobourg, Ontario to Niagara Falls over the course of 30+ hours. The entire experience is worthy of its own blog post, and I hope to post a link to some of my other team members’ blogs.  For the sake of brevity, I plan to discuss the logistics of traveling and running this race strictly gluten free. This race took me away from home (and out of my comfort zone of eating safely gluten free at home) for four days.

To prepare for the race I packed a ton of shelf-stable food in my carry on bag. My stash consisted of Larabars, Zing Bars (one of my new favorite snacks, zingbars.com), GF almonds and cashews from nuts.com, rice cakes and individual packets of almond butter, 2 packets of Glutenfreeda instant oatmeal, and about 4 Go Picnic lunch boxes (www.gopicnic.com).  In the past I would have packed some sort of dried fruit and/or homemade trail mix, but I can no longer eat dried fruits and raisins since I now have a sulfite intolerance/allergy. Nuts.com is the only place where I have been able to find nuts that are not processed on shared equipment with wheat.

Once we arrived in Buffalo, NY, we stopped at Target, where we bought food and supplies for the race, including apples, bananas, clementines, snap peas, baby carrots, and blueberries. I also bought an additional 5 pack of peanut butter and chocolate Larabars. I am not sure why as I had about 20 Larabars in my carry on bag! We stopped for lunch at Chipotle where I had chips and guacamole.  Chipotle’s corn tortilla chips are prepared in a dedicated fryer, and they opened up a virgin container of guacamole for me.  I did not risk eating anything else because I have gotten sick from gluten cross contamination at fast food restaurants more times than I can count, especially in the first 6 months after diagnosis.

We ate at Trattoria Gusto in Port Hope, Ontario on Thursday night.  I had called ahead and discovered that the wife of one of the chefs has Celiac Disease.  I had a mixed greens salad with grilled chicken and butternut squash risotto that were both delicious. I have become a huge risotto fan since being diagnosed with Celiac Disease, as it is usually the one “safe” item on menus in Italian restaurants. In addition, they did have gluten free pizza and pasta options on their menu as well.

We stopped at a random diner for breakfast on Friday morning. Once I learned that the eggs and bacon were prepared in a separate area of the kitchen from the toast and pancakes, I indulged by eating fried eggs and 5 pieces of American Bacon!  This was fitting since my team’s name for the relay was “American Bacon.”

We never really ate lunch on Friday because we were running and then stopping to pick up and drop off runners and cheer people on.  Fresh fruits and Zing Bars and Larabars fueled me.  This lack of eating came back to bite me in the butt at dinnertime, hence my pathetic entrance into Crabby Joe’s while my teammates were eating BBQ at a restaurant that was clearly not gluten free. Once I expressed my hunger and desperation to be able to safely eat to the hostess, the manager asked me what I wanted to eat and within 20 minutes I had a dinner of chicken, a baked potato and steamed asparagus. They cooked the chicken fresh with salt, pepper, and oil in a clean pan, and prepared the rest of my food on clean surfaces that were free from contamination.  This was by far the best meal that I’ve eaten in a chain restaurant since being diagnosed with Celiac Disease in 2010, and I was so grateful for the help of the manager and kitchen staff. If you’re ever in the greater Toronto area and need a restaurant to eat gluten free at, check out Crabby Joe’s.

Breakfast Saturday morning consisted of fruit, coffee, and another Larabar and Zing Bar.  We bought some fresh strawberries from a fruit stand in Ontario, and then stopped at Frog Pond Farm organic winery while Amy, our team captain, was running the last 8 miles of the relay.  It was here that I had a Camino milk chocolate hazelnut bar, which I think may be the best chocolate that I’ve had in my entire life!

We met Amy at the finish line in Niagara Falls around 4:45 pm and we crossed the line together as a team.  We later grabbed dinner at Koutouki, a Greek restaurant that was a little bit off of the main strip.  The waitress who took care of our table was versed in gluten free dining. I had stuffed grape leaves as an appetizer and the chef was able to modify a stuffed chicken breast for me (omitting the sauce which is thickened with flour). Koutouki’s martinis are not too shabby either!

Breakfast on Sunday consisted of bacon, eggs, and fresh fruit at our hotel, and for dinner at the airport I had a Go Picnic boxed lunch while my team mates ate at The Anchor Bar at the Buffalo airport. The Anchor did have “gluten free” wings on their menu, but upon questioning I learned that they do not have a dedicated fryer for the wings. A reminder once again that gluten free items on menus are not always truly gluten free!

All in all, my Ragnar Niagara experience was phenomenal. I met a ton of new people, saw a beautiful part of North America, slept very little, and ate very well. I would do it again in a heart beat! If you have the opportunity to run a Ragnar, go for it!

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My fabulous team at the finish line (I am in the back row in the purple hat). A special thanks to Susan for letting me use her photos, Amy for being our awesome captain and leader, and the rest of my team for their patience, guidance, and support. I hope to see you all again!

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So you just found out that you have Celiac Disease….now what?

This post is in honor of all of us whose only advice was to “eat gluten free” after diagnosis!

1. Cry. Be angry. Complain. Mourn the loss of gluten from your life. You will never be able to eat pasta, pizza, chocolate chip cookies, or drink beer again. Feel sorry for yourself. Cry and yell some more. Get it all out, emotionally, at the beginning. FYI, I was so angry and in denial at first that I ate a whole sleeve of Thin Mint Girl Scout cookies and then cheesy pizza bread sticks within a 24 hour period right after my testing was complete…the effects on my body were so horrible, that I was able to then go gluten free and never look back (I just wish that I been smarter about choosing my last gluten-containing foods).

2. Learn about which foods contain gluten. There is a great list on the Living Without Magazine website (see link). Remember that you can never eat any of the following again: wheat (einkorn, durum, faro, graham, kamut, semolina, or spelt), rye, barley, triticale, malt, malt flavoring, and malt vinegar. Get used to reading ingredient labels and calling companies to inquire about gluten in foods and products. Two of my favorite lists come from the page www.withstyleandgraceblog.com:

Common sources of gluten

gf safe list

3. Purge your kitchen, bathroom, and medicine cabinet of gluten. You will give away/throw away more than you could ever imagine.  Gluten Free Makeup Gal’s website can help with cosmetics and www.glutenfreedrugs.com can help you to find out if gluten is lurking in your medications.

4. Get copies of your Celiac tests (antibodies, genes, pathology results). Read through them, learn from them, and share them with your family members who may need to be tested.

5. Find reliable sources about Celiac Disease and sign up for internet newsletters, Facebook pages, etc. My two favorites are the National Foundaton for Celiac Disease Awareness (www.celiaccentral.org) and the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center (www.cureceliacdisease.org).

6. Do not give in to the urge to replace all of the foods you threw away (pastas, breads, salad dressings, etc.) with gluten free versions. Try one or two gluten free products out a week, as many of these foods are very expensive, may not taste good, and contain a lot of sugar and empty calories. Focus on eating a lot of whole foods (fruits, veggies, lean meats, fish, potatoes, etc) in the first few months if you can.

7. Explore shopping for GF foods online, as you may be able to save quite a bit of money. I’ve been able to order flours and mixes, i.e. Bob’s Red Mill, for almost 50% off what I would have paid at my local grocer.

8. Find a few “go-to” meals and snacks for when you are time pressed but need to be able to safely eat, i.e. Larabars and KIND bars.

9. Find a support group, whether it be it a local group or online. I just joined a fabulous one that was started by Chrissy from “Glam Without Gluten” (see link).

10. Discuss whether or not you need supplements with your doctor or practioner. A lot of us are anemic and/or Vitamin B12 deficient in the beginning. It is important for us to have our Vitamin D levels and our thyroid function monitored. There is emerging information on the role of altered gut flora (bacteria) in inflammation of the digestive system, so you may want to consider a probiotic as well (see my post on probiotics for more details).

11. Encourage your family members to get tested. First degree family members (parents, siblings, and children) have a 1 in 22 risk of also having Celiac Disease. Second degree family members (aunts, uncle, grandparents) have a 1 in 39 risk.

12. Expect a change in how you socialize. Gone are the days when you can freely eat and drink whatever you’d like at every party, potluck, wedding, etc. Some people will go out of their way to accommodate you, and others won’t. Some will care about your diagnosis, and others won’t (and it will be difficult to predict who will care and who won’t). You will feel “left out” at least some of the time. Get used to bringing your own food and snacks wherever you go. I always bring a GF item to every social gathering I attend, so that I am assured that there will be one food that is safe for me to eat.

13. Take care of your body. Run, walk, do yoga, meditate. Use your diagnosis as an opportunity to take charge not only of your diet, but your overall well-being. Once I was gluten free, I was able to run again after years of not having the endurance to run more than 2 miles.

14. Cry. Be angry. Complain. There will be good and bad days at first, but with time, the good days will outnumber the bad. It will get easier, I promise!

One of my favorite reminders to take care of myself:

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Courtesy of www.wholeliving.com

Socializing and Socca Bread

I was recently reminded of how socially isolating Celiac Disease can be.  I attended a day long volunteering orientation during which a complimentary lunch of sub sandwiches and cookies was provided for attendees. I was not surprised by this, and, as usual, packed and brought a lunch from home. I am so far into this whole Celiac thing that I was not bothered by this at all.  The two women sitting closest to me at the orientation were curious as to why I brought own lunch when we knew ahead of time that a free lunch was going to be provided. I went through the whole, “I have Celiac Disease, so I get very sick if I eat gluten,” explanation for the umpteenth time. Again, not a big deal, and I am always happy to educate others about gluten-related illnesses.

When I finished my lunch I grabbed my phone to check my emails. The first 3 emails I read were the following:

1. An invitation to a spaghetti and garlic bread benefit dinner for a local homeless shelter.

2. A reminder that my upcoming book club is at a cheesecake restaurant (I have been there many times and there is nothing on the menu I can eat and no “carry ins” allowed).

3. A local running club invitation to an upcoming ”flatbread and beer” 5K fun run.

This string of emails was a quick wake-up call that those of us with Celiac Disease (1% of the population) are a small minority, that we truly live in a food-based culture, and a reminder that I used to take similar social events totally for granted back when I could attend them.

I fortunately, just this week, came across a recipe for socca bread, a French, chickpea flour-based flatbread which is similar to Italian farinata.  It is gluten free, dairy free, cheap, easy to make, and tastes great. I found the recipe on the website www.thekitchn.com. I used the oven method to make it, as I am ashamed to admit that I do not own a cast iron skllet, and I used Bob’s Red Mill Garbanzo Bean Flour. I am not ashamed to admit that I ate the entire flatbread in less than a day!

Ingredients

1 cup (4 1/2 ounces) chickpea flour
1 cup (8 ounces) water
1 1/2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for the pan
1/2 teaspoon salt
Optional seasonings: 1 tablespoon chopped fresh herbs (rosemary, thyme, oregano), 1-2 cloves minced garlic, 1/8-1/2 teaspoon spice (chili powder, cumin, smoked paprika, za’atar)

Equipment

10-inch cast-iron skillet, pie tin, or other metal baking dish
Spatula
Knife

Instructions

Makes 1 thick 10″ pancake or 2 thin 10″ pancakes (recipe can be multiplied)

1. Prepare the Chickpea Batter – Whisk together the chickpea flour, water, olive oil, and salt in a small bowl. Let rest for 1/2 hour to 2 hours to give the flour time to absorb the water.

2. Heat the Broiler and the Pan – Set an oven rack six inches below your oven’s broiler and turn on the broiler. Set a cast iron skillet or other baking dish on the rack to warm for five minutes.

3. Pour the Batter – Remove the skillet from the oven using oven mitts. Add a teaspoon or so of olive oil and swirl to coat the bottom of the pan. Whisk the chickpea batter quickly and then pour half into the hot skillet (or all if making a thicker pancake). Tilt the pan so the batter coats the entire surface of the pan.

4. Broil the Socca – Broil for 3 to 5 minutes, until you see the top of the socca begin to blister and brown. If you find the top browning before the batter is fully set, move the skillet to a lower oven rack until done. The socca should be fairly flexible in the middle but crispy on the edges.

5. Slice and Serve – Use a spatula to work your way under the socca and ease it from the pan. Slice it into wedges or squares, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and drizzle with a little good olive oil. Repeat with any remaining batter.

Socca is best if eaten immediately after baking while still warm, but can be refrigerated and re-toasted for up to a week.

Additional Notes:

To Bake in the Oven: Heat the oven to 450°F and pre-heat the baking dish for 5 minutes. Bake the socca for 8-10 minutes, until it’s cooked through, then run it under the broiler to blister the top.

To Bake on the Stove Top: Film a pan with oil and set over medium-high heat. Pour in the socca batter. After about 3 minutes when the edges are firm, gently lift the pancake and flip it. Cook on the other side for another 2 to 3 minutes, until both surfaces are dry and beginning to brown.

I plan on making socca often, and sharing it with many. I may even have my own socca bread party so that I can actually socialize and eat at the same time. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

Disclaimer: The socca bread which I made looked nowhere near as pretty as the socca bread photo which I found on www.wholeliving.com. Their website also has a few different recipes and suggestions for socca bread preparation.

Book Review: “Adam’s Gluten Free Surprise” by Debbie Simpson

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I discovered this book by reading a review written by “Celiac Yoga Momma.” I ordered my own copy, snuggled up with my three oldest kids over the weekend, and gave it a read. It could not have come at a better time as we’ve recently transitioned to being a totally gluten free household, which has been easier said than done.

This book shares the struggles of a little boy with celiac disease named Adam. His classroom is “typical” in the sense that parents and teachers provide treats on a regular basis, i.e. ice cream cones and pizza parties. As the school year progresses, Adam’s teacher and classmates gain a better understanding of what it means to have celiac disease and live gluten free. There is a great surprise at the end which I will not ruin for you!

“Adam’s Gluten Free Surprise” is a excellent book to read to any child with celiac disease, gluten sensitivity, and/or other food allergies. It is also an important read for any child who would benefit from having a better understanding of food allergies and intolerances, especially siblings and classmates of such children.

After we were finished with this book, my first grader and I had a nice discussion about all of the kids in her classroom who have food allergies. My preschoolers both gained a better understanding of celiac disease and why I have to be so careful to avoid foods with gluten. They asked me multiple times if I ever get sad like Adam does about not being able to eat “gluten foods” anymore…

Although Adam is an 8 year old boy, I found myself able to relate to him throughout the book. Just today I walked into our break room at work and it looked as if a “gluten bomb” had gone off. The tables and countertops were piled with cupcakes, pretzels, Chex mixes, Christmas cookies, muffins, breads, etc. and there were about one million crumbs on the floor. I related to little Adam very well as I carefully heated up my gluten free lunch and ran out.

Please check out author Debbie Simpson’s website at www.dsimpsonbooks.com. The book can be ordered through amazon.com and there are reduced prices between now and New Year’s.

This is one of my favorite pages from the book. I hope that you enjoy it as much as I did.

brown (celiac)

My “Unlucky” Seven

Since going gluten free 3 years ago I have made my share of mistakes leading to “glutenings.” Most of them were in my first 6 months post-diagnosis. I am sharing my list in hopes that I may prevent others from getting sick like I did. I am also sharing so that friends and family members of Celiacs may understand why their Celiac loved one may seem to be “paranoid” from time to time.

1. Shampoo: I had a bad case of brassy highlights and bought a “blueing” shampoo to use a few times a week to neutralize the brassiness. Lo and behold, I began to feel ill, and one morning, as I read the ingredients while in the shower, I realized that my shampoo contained hydrolyzed wheat protein. There is a lot of controversy about whether or not gluten can be absorbed through the skin, but in this case, I believe that a little bit of shampoo was probably getting into my mouth while I was rinsing my hair. I stopped using the shampoo and my symptoms went away. Problem solved. My lesson learned was to always read the ingredients in hair products before buying and using them.

2. Playdough: Yes, this seems obvious, but I honestly thought that if I washed my hands carefully after playing with it, that I would be safe. I had figured that as long as I didn’t actually eat the Playdough that I would be fine. I was totally wrong. If you’re a Celiac with kids, you cannot touch Playdough with a ten foot pole! Trust me.

3. Eating gluten free pizza at a pizza parlor that makes regular pizza: Looking back, it seems obvious that this was a bad idea, but I had confirmed with the kitchen staff ahead of time that there were no gluten ingredients, that the gluten free pizza would be made on a separate surface, that the flour used to roll out my pizza was gluten free, etc. I learned a lesson in cross-contamination.

4. Hand sanitizer: I was traveling for a work conference, through lots of dirty airports, subways, etc. in the middle of winter, so I used a lot of hand sanitizer. Unfortunately, I soon discovered that it had wheat amino acids in it. Like the shampoo incident, I don’t believe that I absorbed the wheat protein through my skin, but I used the sanitizer many times before eating, and thus, probably ingested trace amounts that built up in my system and made me ill.

5. Soup at an airport café: As most celiacs know, soups are usually unsafe. I was at an Au Bon Pain at a major airport (yes, a very poor choice of café for a Celiac) and was pregnant and starving. The soup was labeled as a gluten free white bean soup and there were ingredients listed, which were all “safe.” But it wasn’t actually safe at all. I am pretty sure that the ladle must have been contaminated by being dipped in some of the other soups, and then put back into the gluten free one. That was the last bowl of soup that I ever ate….

6. Making Christmas cookies: This happened shortly after the Playdough incident, but I was still in denial that I could get sick just from touching/handling wheat flour. My kids and I made dozens and dozens of cut-out Christmas cookies using regular flour. I washed my hands numerous times, picked dough out from underneath my fingernails, and obviously didn’t eat any of the cookies, but still got majorly glutened. Hence, the gluten free cut-out cookie recipe that I shared with you last week!

7. Trusting a “no gluten ingredients” label: This was my most recent glutening. We do not live near a Trader Joe’s but will often stop at one when traveling. I have always avoided any of their products that have the disclaimer that they are made on “shared equipment” with wheat because I know I am sensitive and react to traces of gluten. We bought and prepared a basic spaghetti sauce that was marked as “no gluten ingredients” and did not have the shared equipment warning on it. We ate it with rice pasta for dinner and I got sick (no one else in my family did). I contacted Trader Joe’s via email and they did write back that the sauce was made on shared equipment. I have learned to never make any assumptions about processed foods.

As time has passed I have learned how careful I really need to be to prevent getting sick. I wish that I knew at diagnosis what I know now, that being “gluten free” is not as simple as it sounds and to not take risks with the diet. For those of us with Celiac Disease, eating gluten free is not trendy or a “fad,” it is the difference between sickness and health. As the actress Jennifer Esposito, a Celiac, recently stated, “This disease is no joke.” I wholeheartedly agree.

Easy Cut-Out Gluten Free Christmas Cookies

I made the mistake of making regular Christmas cookies with my kids my first winter after diagnosis. Even though I did not eat the cookies, I experienced a major “glutening” episode from just working with the cookie dough. The next year I came across the following recipe for gluten free  holiday cookies, and I’ve used it ever since. My friends and family have not been able to detect a difference between these cookies and “regular” Christmas cookies. Plus it’s an easy recipe!

Ingredients:

1 cup of sugar

1 cup of butter, softened

2 egg yolks

1-1/2 teaspoons GF vanilla extract

1/4 teaspoon salt

2 1/4 cups GF flour blend (this is made by mixing 2 cups of white rice flour, 2/3 cups of potato starch, 1/3 cup of tapioca flour, and 1 teaspoon xanthan gum. I left out the xanthan gum the last time and it turned out fine too)

Directions:

1. Combine sugar and butter in a large bowl. Beat at medium speed, scraping the bowl often, until creamy. Add egg yolks and vanilla. Continue beating, scraping often, until well mixed. Reduce speed to low; add GF flour blend and salt. Beat until well mixed. Cover and refrigerate until firm (approximately 1 hour).

2. Heat oven to 350 degrees F. Roll out dough on surface lightly dusted with GF flour, one half at a time (keep other half in refrigerator), until 1/4 inch thick. Cut into shapes with cookie cutters. Place 1 inch apart on ungreased cookie sheets.

3. Bake for 8 to 12 minutes or until edges are lightly browned. Let stand 2 minutes and remove from cookie sheets. Makes approx. 36 cookies.

Enjoy!