Tag Archives: gluten cross contamination

CeliAction Study Extension

I sincerely hope to be back to blogging soon. In the meantime I wanted to let you all know that the CeliAction Study has been extended through September 2014, so it is not too late to participate. All questions and comments on this post will receive responses from a CeliAction Study representative. I hope you are all having a great summer!  -Jess

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Did you know there isn’t a single drug approved to treat celiac disease? Currently, attempting a gluten-free diet is the only option recommended by doctors, but a clinical research study called the CeliAction Study is researching if an investigational drug improves any symptoms of the disease.

You may qualify for the CeliAction Study if you:

  • Have been diagnosed with celiac disease by a healthcare professional
  • Are attempting to be on a gluten-free diet
  • Have experienced at least one moderate or severe symptom of celiac disease in the past month

If you participate in the CeliAction Study, you:

  • Will be able to maintain your current diet restrictions
  • Will be provided with study-related care at no cost
  • Do not need medical insurance to take part
  • May be compensated for time and travel
  • Will help advance medical research for celiac disease

To learn more about this research study and see if you qualify, visit www.CeliActionStudy.com
or call 1-855-3333-ACT.

An Introduction to the CeliAction Study

This is the first of a series of sponsored posts about the Celiaction Study on my page. Since being diagnosed with celiac disease in 2010 I have been patiently waiting for treatment options to augment the GF diet.  Although I eat strictly GF and am safely able to do so in my home, I am at risk of gluten cross-contamination whenever I travel and/or eat outside of my home.  The enzyme being studied has the potential to reduce intestinal damage from gluten cross-contamination, and is also being evaluated as a treatment for those with nonresponsive celiac disease.  All comments and questions will receive a response from a Celiaction Study representative. -Jess

celiactionblogpost

Managing celiac disease may be more than just a gluten-free diet.

A clinical research study called the CeliAction Study is researching if an investigational drug – which would be taken as a supplement to an attempted gluten-free diet – improves any symptoms of celiac disease.

You may qualify for the CeliAction Study if you:

  • Have been diagnosed with celiac disease by a healthcare professional
  • Are attempting to be on a gluten-free diet
  • Have experienced at least one moderate or severe symptom of celiac disease in the past month

If you participate in the CeliAction Study, you:

  • Will be able to maintain your current diet restrictions
  • Will be provided with study-related care at no cost
  • Do not need medical insurance to take part
  • May be compensated for time and travel
  • Will help advance medical research for celiac disease

To learn more about this research study and see if you qualify, visit CeliActionStudy.com
or call 1-855-3333-ACT.

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The Gluten Contamination Elimination Diet

As many of us already know, there are some celiacs who are “refractory” and continue to have ongoing symptoms after going gluten free. In addition, there are a bunch of us who are “super sensitive” in terms of reactions to gluten cross-contamination. I am one of the super sensitives. Not too long ago I had a reaction from eating one bite of a Trader Joe’s “no gluten ingredients” brownie which I had prepared in my own gluten free kitchen for a potluck.

Just last week, Dr. Fasano and colleagues published a research paper on the effects of 3-6 months of a diet of exclusively whole, unprocessed foods on the symptoms of celiac patients who had no improvement while eating strictly gluten free. In this study patients were considered to have non-responsive celiac disease (NRCD) if they failed to respond to the gluten free diet or had a recurrence/relapse of symptoms despite being gluten free. Steroids are currently the standard of care for treating NRCD, which as we know can have serious side effects.

The researchers coined their diet the “Gluten Contamination Elimination Diet.” Here is the breakdown of foods with are allowed and prohibited on this diet:

Allowed: brown and white rice; all fresh fruits and vegetables; fresh meats; fish; eggs; dried beans; unseasoned nuts in the shell; butter; plain yogurt; plain milk, and aged cheeses; oils; vinegar (except flavored or malt); honey; salt. Beverages allowed include 100% juices, water, and Gatorade.

Not allowed: millet, sorghum, buckwheat or any other grains, seeds, or flours; frozen, canned, or dried fruits and vegetables; lunch meats; ham; bacon; seasoned or flavored dairy products; processed cheeses; flavored and malt vinegars.

Basically, all processed foods are eliminated. Of note, dairy is not reintroduced until week 4 of the diet.

17 patients with NRCD, all female, were placed on this diet for an average of 3-6 months. 14 of the 17 (82%) significantly improved on the Gluten Contamination Elimination Diet. Of those who did have biopsies performed after the diet, all but one had resolution of their villous atrophy. This is important information as there have been a lot of recent studies showing that persistent villous atrophy is common in celiac disease. Most of the patients in this study were able to eventually resume a “traditional” gluten free diet.

It has taken me over 3 years, and a lot of trial and error, to figure out the foods which my body loves and hates. Interestingly enough, my body’s food preferences are almost identical to the foods on the “allowed” list in this diet. Had I known about this diet, and adhered to it when I was first diagnosed, it would have saved me a ton of pain and anguish. I am optimistic that this diet (or a similar version) will become the standard of care for those newly diagnosed with Celiac Disease, and I hope that this happens sooner than later. If we work together, we can get the word out!

Reference: “Trace gluten contamination may play a role in mucosal and clinical recovery in a subgroup of diet-adherent non-responsive celiac disease patients.” BMC Gastroenterology. 2013. 13:40 (e-pub).