Tag Archives: celiac management

ID-100260936

Updated Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Management of Adult Celiac Disease

I tried to abstain from reviewing celiac disease research for my 10 day vacation to Massachusetts and failed (proving that I am a big nerd). Earlier today when I checked out Pubmed.gov I came across a June 10th publication entitled “Diagnosis and management of adult coeliac disease: guidelines from the British Society of Gastroenterology.” This paper summarizes recommendations and information from a panel of 21 worldwide celiac disease experts.  You can find the entire article here. If you have the time, the entire article is worth reading.

As I read I learned some new facts, figures, and celiac disease information:

6-22% of cases of celiac disease are seronegative. This means that between 6-22% of people with celiac disease do not have abnormally high antibodies on celiac blood screening tests but do have abnormal small intestinal tissue on biopsy.

First degree family members of celiacs (parents, siblings, and children) have a 16-fold increased risk of also developing celiac disease if they are HLA-DQ2 positive on celiac gene testing.

If a patient has abnormally high celiac disease antibodies, but a normal small bowel biopsy when endoscopy is done (no signs of celiac), then some of the experts recommend that endoscopy be repeated so that jejunal biopsies can be performed. The jejunum is the 2nd portion of the small intestine and is not normally biopsied when a patient is evaluated for celiac disease.  Video capsule endoscopy can also be used in equivocal cases.

Biopsy reports should include all of the following (this is a bit technical but important for those of us who have copies of our own reports, and/or our family members’):

  • Number of biopsies (including those from the duodenal bulb) and orientation.
  • The architectural features (normal, partial, sub-total or total villous atrophy).
  • Comment on the content of the lamina propria (in CD these are lymphocytes, plasma cells and eosinophils, and occasionally neutrophils, but cryptitis and crypt abscesses should suggest other pathology).
  • Presence of Brunner’s glands.
  • Presence of crypt hyperplasia, villous height: crypt depth ratio (3:1).112 The absence of plasma cells suggests common variable immunodeficiency.
  • Evaluation of IELs (with immunocytochemical staining for T cells (CD3) in equivocal cases) is vital.

After diagnosis with celiac disease, adults should be followed-up annually with all of the following: complete blood count, ferritin, folate, Vitamin B12, calcium and alkaline phosphatase levels, thyroid function testing and glucose levels, liver function tests, and celiac antibody levels. In the absence of symptoms, having a follow-up biopsy appears to be controversial. Most of the experts recommended that it be done between 2 and 5 years after diagnosis. 6 months after diagnosis definitely appears to be too soon.

In regards to a gluten challenge, the authors stated: “To perform a gluten challenge, a recent study recommends a 14-day gluten intake at ≥3 g of gluten/day (two slices of wheat bread per day) to induce histological and serological changes in the majority of adults with CD. The challenge can be prolonged to 8 weeks if serology remains negative at 2 weeks.”

In conclusion, this paper is a comprehensive overview of the latest and greatest in regards to celiac disease in adults.  Now that I’ve discussed it I am going to return to my vacation! Hope that you’re all having a good summer thus far. Please let me know if you come across any interesting articles, research, etc.

Reference:

Ludvigsson J, Bai J, Biagi F, Card TR, Ciacci C, Ciclitira PJ, Green P, Hadjivassiliou M, Holdoway A, van Heel DA, Kaukinen K, Leffler DA, Leonard JN, Lundin KE, McGough N, Davidson M, Murray JA, Swift GL, Walker MM, Zingone F, Sanders DS; Authors of the BSG Coeliac Disease Guidelines Development Group. Diagnosis and management of adult coeliac disease: guidelines from the British Society of Gastroenterology. Gut. 2014 Jun 10. pii: gutjnl-2013-306578. doi: 10.1136/gutjnl-2013-306578. [Epub ahead of print]