Tag Archives: celiac disease and sulfite intolerance

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Happy Sulfite Intolerance

I started to develop chest tightness and wheezing out of the blue in the middle of running with one of my neighbors last spring. I figured that I was out of shape from my pregnancy and the strange sensation slowly resolved as I walked. But then it came back again and again, each time a little bit worse, and sometimes with chest pain. I had a chest CT to evaluate for a pulmonary embolism, since I was at risk due to being postpartum, and it was normal. My chest x-ray was normal too. My heart tests, including an EKG and Echocardiogram, were unremarkable.

One night at work I had to go to the ED because I was having so much difficulty with breathing. I was diagnosed with possible asthma, given albuterol, and sent home with a prescription for a course of oral steroids. Despite the treatment, over the course of the next few weeks my breathing declined. I went from being able to run a 10K to getting winded and short of breath walking across a Target store. I wracked my brain trying to figure out why asthma would just “pop up” suddenly when I was in my mid-thirties….

I had pulmonary function tests and a methacholine challenge, to look for exercise-induced asthma, about 6 weeks after my symptoms first started, and everything was normal (I did not have asthma).

I began to notice that my chest tightness/wheezing would occur shortly after eating. Around this time I was back to work and eating a lot of Apple Cinnamon Chex and KIND bars for both snacks and meal replacements. I began to keep a food journal and discovered that all the the following foods were triggers for my symptoms: Apple Cinnamon Chex, raisins, wine, Juices, KIND bars, eggs, certain bottled waters, balsamic vinegar, shrimp, and anything that contained molasses as an ingredient. I looked at a box of Apple Cinnamon Chex over and over until I saw the words “contains sodium sulfite.” I did a web search for foods that contain sulfites, and I found that ALL of my trigger foods were on the list. I discovered that I had a sulfite intolerance, which is also called a “sulfite allergy.”

FAQ about about sulfites:

What are sulfites?

Sulfites are sulphur-based compounds which are added to foods and supplements as a preservative and/or flavor enhancer. They may also occur naturally. Sulfite sensitive individuals need to avoid all of the following:

  • sulfur dioxide
  • sulfurous acid
  • sodium sulfite, sodium bisulfate and sodium metabisulfate
  • potassium sulfite, potassium bisulfite and postassium metabisulfite

What foods contain sulfites?

  • Baked goods
  • Beverages (including beer, wine, hard cider, fruit juice, vegetable juice, and tea)
  • Bottled lemon and lime juice (concentrates)
  • Condiments
  • Cornstarch
  • Dried fruits
  • Dried and/or processed potatoes
  • Fruit toppings/jams/jellies
  • Gravies
  • Maraschino cherries
  • Molasses
  • Sauerkraut
  • Shrimp
  • Soy
  • Vinegar
  • Wine

The most comprehensive list and forum to check out regarding sulfites is the website: www.holdthesulfites.com.

Sulfites can be present in medications. A lot of generic acetaminophen tablets and other OTC meds contain sodium metabisulfite.  Cornstarch, which is sulfited during processing, is a filler in a lot of pills, and depending on the degree of one’s sulfite sensitivity, may trigger a reaction.

Why do people develop a sulfite intolerance?

We do not know. Most of the scientific papers about sulfite allergies are case reports which were published back in the 1980s (most are in French). Some theories I have come across on the internet regarding why a sulfite intolerance develops include that sufferers may have a partial sulfite oxidase deficiency (a full deficiency is fatal, so perhaps we are “carriers” of the gene and express some symptoms), or that symptoms are due to a deficiency of molybdenum, which is a mineral cofactor in the breakdown of sulfites. Other lines of thought are that the intolerance is related to an environmental exposure of some sort and/or is immune-related (a non-IgE mediated food allergy). In my interactions with others with this problem it seems like a lot of us have either Celiac Disease or gluten sensitivity. But, this is all anecdotal, as there is no research out there (and as far as I know, no one doing any research into the problem of sulfite issues).

How is a sulfite intolerance treated?

The most important thing is the obvious: avoid sulfites! However, this is easier said than done! The only mandatory labeling is for foods and drinks with a lot of sulfites added in, such as wine,  beer, and hard cider. Other foods which contain sulfites, such as dried fruits and KIND bars, do not have mandatory labeling. I have been unable to find any GF, sulfite free beers or hard ciders. The main sulfite free wine makers are Frey and Orleans Hill. I am partial to the Orleans Hill’s Zinfandel, Syrah, and Cabernet, and am slowly getting used to bringing my own bottle with me when I socialize. Many people report a lessening of symptoms while taking Molybdenum. I tried Molybdenum, and, unfortunately, and it did not help me. Other supplements which I have seen recommended include Vitamin B12, Magnesium, and Probiotics. It also never hurts to have an Epipen (or 2) around, just in case of a severe reaction.  Ironically, though, Epipens do contain sulfites as preservatives!

How are sulfites metabolized?

Sulfite Metabolic Pathway (from http://pathman.smpdb.ca/pathways/SMP00041/pathway):

Sulfur_Metabolism_a

Update January 2014: Since writing this post last spring I discovered that my sulfite intolerance is the result of an immune system disorder called mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) and I have since started on a treatment regimen.  Please see my recent post on MCAS for more details. Thank you.

References/Links:

1. www.holdthesulfites.com: This is hands-down the most comprehensive resource out there for those who are suffering with sulfite issues.

2. “Allergies and Sulfite Sensitivity.” www.webmd.com. 2012.

3. American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Nutrition Care Manual (accessed 8/10/12)

*Also, a quick reminder that this is a blog. I am summarizing medical literature, but also adding in my own thoughts and opinions on what I have read. I am not trying to tell anyone what they should do for their own health, nor am I giving medical advice through this page. Thank you!