Tag Archives: celiac abstracts

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2013 International Celiac Disease Symposium Poster Highlights

Although I did not allot enough time to check out all of the posters of abstracts that were on display at the International Celiac Disease Symposium (ICDS) in person, all of us received a spiral bound book that contained the hundreds of scientific posters that were presented. Abstracts are summaries of new research studies, and in many cases, they have not yet been published in a journal. I have started to review the book of abstracts that I received from the ICDS and there are some abstracts that are truly fascinating. We’ll hopefully hear more about these studies in the future as they get published in journals.

Here is a brief synopsis of five of the most interesting studies that I’ve been reading about:

1. “Nine years of follow-up of potential celiac disease in children.” A group of researchers from Naples, Italy (Aurrichio, et al) followed 156 with potential celiac disease who were not on a GF diet. Potential celiac disease, as I discussed here, is when a patient has abnormally high celiac antibodies on blood screening, and often symptoms, but a normal intestinal biopsy. The management is currently controversial. In this study, over a 5-year period, 46.8% of the children with potential celiac disease developed full-blown celiac disease.

2. “Celiac disease detection in asymptomatic children of 2 and 11 years old in a primary care health center using a transglutaminase antibodies quick test.” A Spanish team (Vallejo, et al) screened groups of 2 and 11 year olds for celiac disease in an outpatient clinic using rapid tests. 2% of the 2 year olds had confirmed celiac disease, and 1.5% of the 11 years had celiac disease. The overall rate of celiac disease in their population was 1.7%, which is higher than previously described.

3. “Absence of HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 does not exclude celiac disease in Brazilian patients.” HLA DQ2 and DQ8 are the 2 main celiac disease genes and are the ones that are currently tested for by most U.S. laboratories. In this study, a Brazilian team (Kotze, et al) performed gene tests on 101 patients with biopsy confirmed celiac disease. They found that 9 (8.9%) of their patients with celiac disease were DQ2 and DQ8 negative. They suspect that this is related to having such an ethnically diverse population in Brazil.

4. “Neurological dysfunction in patients with newly diagnosed celiac disease: a large prospective study.” Dr. Hadjivassiliou and team from the UK performed neurological evaluations on 73 patients with newly diagnosed celiac disease. 63% complained of neurologic symptoms; the most common were frequent headaches, problems with balance, and sensory symptoms. 32% had abnormal white matter lesions on MRI scanning and 43% had abnormal spectroscopy of the vermis of the cerebellum. The cerebellum is the part of the brain involved in balance and posture.

5. “Potential or definite celiac disease: push enteroscopy changes the diagnosis.” A celiac research team from the UK, lead by Dr. Eross, evaluated 16 patients with “potential” celiac disease. Potential celiac disease, as discussed above, is the term for when a patient has abnormally elevated celiac antibodies but no evidence of celiac disease on small bowel biopsy. They found that when their original duodenal biopsies were re-reviewed and biopsies of the jejunum (2nd part of the small intestine that is not typically biopsied when a patient is evaluated for celiac disease) were performed that 15 of the 16 patients actually did have celiac disease. They recommend that a diagnosis of potential celiac disease can only be made if the jejunum has been evaluated by biopsy.

Please let me know if you are interested in reading more about the abstracts that were presented at the ICDS poster session, as there are literally hundreds more that I can summarize for you. Also, I would love to hear about any interesting research that you have stumbled upon!