Tag Archives: CDGEMM study

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CDGEMM Study: An effort to understand why celiac disease develops (and what can be done to prevent it)

The Celiac Disease Genomic, Environmental, Microbiome, and Metabolomic (CDGEMM) Study, recently launched by the Center for Celiac Research at Mass General Hospital for Children, is a long-term, prospective study aimed at understanding the genetic, microbial (gut bacteria), and environmental processes that trigger the onset of celiac disease—the information gathered by this study will help to explain why celiac disease develops with an ultimate goal to be able to prevent the development of celiac disease and other autoimmune conditions.

The principal investigators, Drs. Maureen Leonard and Alessio Fasano, aim to recruit 500 infants from age 0 to 6 months of age who have a first-degree relative (mother, father, and/or sibling) with celiac disease. According to study materials, the risk of developing celiac disease in those with a first-degree relative with celiac is 8-15% compared with 1% in the general population. Subjects enrolled in the CDGEMM Study will be tested for the presence of celiac disease genes and then followed until age five via blood and stool samples. Parental involvement includes keeping a diary of dietary patterns and antibiotic use during the first year of life, and then completing online questionnaires every six months. Subjects can be enrolled from anywhere in the U.S. There is no travel requirement as blood samples can be collected from local pediatrician’s offices/labs and sent in and stool samples are collected at home and mailed in.

To learn more about the CDGEMM study, including FAQs about the study, you can visit the website  www.CDGEMM.org or email the study coordinators at CDGEMM@mgh.harvard.edu.

For more detailed scientific information about the study, please refer to the following paper:

Leonard, M., Camhi, S., Huedo-Medina, T., Fasano, A. Celiac Disease Genomic, Environmental, Microbiome, and Metabolomic (CDGEMM) Study Design: Approach to the Future of Personalized Prevention of Celiac Disease. Nutrients. 2015. 7: 9325-9336.