Tag Archives: antibiotics and celiac disease

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Celiac Disease “Journal Club” 2013 Part 1

As some of you may have figured out, I love to keep up to date with the latest research regarding celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). My interest in research stems from the countless Journal Clubs that I participated in during my decade of medical training. Journal Club gives medical students, residents, fellows, and other trainees the opportunity to learn how to read, interpret, and critically review research articles. Although there are many things which I do not miss about medical training (especially the sleep deprivation), I do miss Journal Club.

I have created my own overview for you of some of the most interesting research articles about gluten-related diseases that have been published during the past few months. This is part 1 of 2.

1. “Clinical features and symptom recovery on a gluten-free diet in Canadian adults with celiac disease.” Authors: Pulido, et al. Published in the Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology in August 2013.

-Almost 6000 adults with Celiac Disease were surveyed regarding their symptoms of Celiac Disease and their recovery on the GF diet. Average age at diagnosis was 45 and average delay in diagnosis was 12 years.

-Conclusions: Although many subjects had a complete resolution of symptoms after 5 years on the GF diet, almost half reported continuing problems with migraines, lactose intolerance, constipation, itchy skin, and depression after being GF for 5 years. Women were less likely than men to report full recovery from symptoms, especially in the areas of abdominal pain, bloating, weakness, diarrhea, anemia, muscle cramps, constipation, migraine headaches, and swelling of the hands and feet.

2.  “Mucosal healing and risk for lymphoproliferative malignancy in celiac disease: a population-based cohort study.” Authors: Lebwohl, et al. Published in Annals of Internal Medicine in August 2013.

-Researchers found that 43% of adults with Celiac Disease in their study population had persistent villous atrophy on follow-up biopsies after being GF. These patients were found to have a significantly higher (3.5x) risk of lymphoma than the general population.

-Conclusion: Partially treated Celiac Disease is associated with cancer.

-For more information please check out this summary article from Columbia University.

3. “Antibiotic exposure and the development of celiac disease: a nationwide case-control study.” Authors: Marild, K., et al. Published in BMC Gastroenterology in July 2013.

-Main objective of the study was to examine the association between antibiotic use and the subsequent development of celiac disease by comparing subjects with celiac disease with matched controls (subjects without celiac disease).

-Antibiotic exposure was found to be associated with an increased risk of celiac disease, intestinal inflammation, and “potential” celiac disease (elevated Celiac antibodies on blood testing without any small intestinal changes seen on small bowel biopsy).

-Conclusion: The first study to show an association between antibiotic doses and the subsequent development of celiac disease. The authors postulate that an alteration of gut flora (ie. killing off of “good” bacteria) may play a role in the development of celiac disease.

4. “Markers of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity in children with autism.” Authors: Lau, N, et al. Published in PLOS One in June 2013.

-The researchers examined 37 children with autism and found that they had significantly higher levels of anti-gliadin IgG antibodies than children without autism (controls)

-Of the autistic children with anti-gliadin antibodies, most did not have either of the celiac genes (HLA-DQ2 and DQ8) and did not have other celiac antibodies (TTG IgA and IgG and DGP IgA and IgG). However, the majority of autistic children with anti-gliadin antibodies did have gastrointestinal symptoms.

-Conclusion: The anti-gliadin (gluten) immune response in autism involves a mechanism that is different from celiac disease.

5. “Colonic involvement in celiac disease and possible implications of the sigmoid mucosa involvement in its diagnosis.” Authors: Picarelli, A., et al. Published in the Journal of Clinical Immunology in July 2013.

-Researchers took samples of the colon (large intestine) of patients with Celiac Disease and evaluated the samples for celiac antibodies. They found that 75% of patients with Celiac Disease had anti-endomysial antibodies and 81% had anti-TTG antibodies in colonic tissue.

-Conclusion: The immune tissues of the large intestine are affected by Celiac Disease. In the future, large intestinal biopsies may be used in diagnosis.

Part 2 will be coming soon. Please feel free to comment and share articles related to celiac disease and/or non-celiac gluten sensitivity which you have found interesting as well. I would love to discuss.